Friday, December 2, 2011

Printable Garden Guide


Garden Guide
“Study the best methods of providing your own foods.
Make your garden … neat and attractive as well as productive.
If there are children in your home, involve them in
the process with assigned responsibilities.”
                                                                                                          Spencer W. Kimball, May 1976

Consider
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       Location, Spacing, Sunlight, Soil, Watering, Fertilizing


   Cool Weather Crops
Planting Schedule
Cold weather crops can tolerate frost plants
  and can be planted before the last frost.

Arugula
  Beets
  Broccoli
  Brussel Sprouts
  Carrot
  Cauliflower
  Garlic
  Kale
  Onion Family
  Lettuce
   Parsley
  Peas
  Radish
  Spinach
 

Warm Weather Crops
Planting Schedule
Warm weather crops will be hurt by
frost, and must be planted after the last frost.
Beans
Celery
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Okra
Squash
Tomatoes
Peppers
Pumpkin
Sunflower
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard

Some crops take so long to grow, it is best to transplant them. Examples of these are tomatoes, cabbage, and peppers.
7 WEEKS TO LAST FROST
Start seeds of tomatoes, hot peppers, and early basil indoors.
 4 WEEKS TO LAST FROST
Plant potato eyes
1-2 WEEKS AFTER FROST
Plant sweet potato slips



Seeds

If your seeds are stored properly, they can last for up to 5 years.
Ideal Storage is a cool, dark place. The refrigerator in a jar keeps the seeds fresh.
The older the seeds get, the germination rate goes down.

Insect Control
 Insects can be very damaging to your garden.
Remove insects by hand, wash them off, or kill them with insecticide.
If you use an insecticide, you must wash the food before eating it.
Dawn Dish Detergent mixed with water in a spray bottle is an great bug spray.

 
Fertilizer and Compost
Mel’s Mix:
(Square Foot Gardening Expert)
1/3 vermiculite
1/3 peat moss
1/3 compost

Water
Plants can absorb nutrients in soil faster and grow better
when soil and water are at a warm temperature.

Tomatoes
Farmer’s Advice
Pick the leaves on the stem of the tomato once the tomato starts growing.
This will give the tomato nutrients instead of the leaves.
Tomatoes need nitrogen and calcium in the fertilizer. An excellent way of achieving this is digging a two foot hole next to the plant and bury a raw fish head in it.
If the bottom of your tomatoes is black, this means it means your plant is calcium deficient. Be consistent with watering to make sure the plant is getting consistent nutrition. It is good to give the tomato more fertilizer every three weeks.

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